• E027 Lest We Forget

    Welcome to English with Kimberley.

    As I write the script of this this episode on 11 November a few hours before 11.00 am, I want to tell you about this very special day in countries like Australia – and why we call it a ‘commemoration’ and not a ‘celebration’.
    On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month there is almost – everywhere in countries like Australia – a one or two-minute silence to allow people to remember the loss and suffering that has occurred not just in the Great War (now known as World War 1) but all armed conflicts around the world.

    But what is the name of this day?

    Is it…

    a) Army Day?

    b) Remembering Day?

    c) Commemoration Day?

    Or d) Remembrance Day?

    And again, what is the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month known as?

    Is it…

    a) Army Day?

    b) Remembering Day?

    c) Commemoration Day?

    Or d) Remembrance Day?

    Well, the day is often known by several names such as armistice day, veterans day or even ‘poppy’ day – but mostly it is known by many as d) ‘Remembrance Day’.

    Poppy day comes from the idea that the poppy flower was the first to grow after a battle in the fields of Belgium during World War 1 – They are red in colour and paper ones are almost worn by everyone around this time.

    By the way, the 11th hour of the 11th day of November in 1918 was when the First World War ‘officially’ finished.

    We commemorate to remember and honour the memory of people and events that have involved great loss and sadness. They often involve formal events and special clothes, lots of silence, serious expressions and deep thoughts.

    On the other hand, we celebrate people and events that give us great joy and hope like religious days, a national identity day, birthdays and so on. These events often involve colourful costumes, parties, laughter and happiness.

    So, that’s the difference between a commemoration and celebration – something that often confuses people, especially non-English speakers.

    Our final quiz doesn’t have an answer I can give in this podcast.
    But, in your country of origin, what do you commemorate and celebrate?

    Why do you commemorate or celebrate them?

    Ask some friends and relatives if you’re not too sure and do some research on the internet.
    If you like English with Kimberley, then tell your friends about it.

    You can also leave feedback about this podcast on iTunes.

    You can also find a script of this podcast at www.goaustralia.biz

    I hope you have enjoyed this podcast and you’ll join me again.

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