• E014 Sugar and Spice

    Welcome to English with Kimberley.

    In this episode, I want to talk to you about how we tell people what something is made with or from while, at the same time, not say who made it.

    For example, a popular English poem says that all girls are made from sugar and spice, while boys, on the other hand, are made from something not so nice!

    So, to our fist quiz of the podcast.

    Choose the odd one out. That is, which sentence isn’t like the others?

    a) Lots of houses are being built in Sydney.

    b) The bank was robbed last week.

    c) Patients are treated by doctors.

    or d) I made a lamington cake last week.

    Shall I repeat the question?

    Choose the odd one out. That is, which sentence isn’t like the others?

    a) Lots of houses are being built in Sydney.

    b) The bank was robbed last week.

    c) Patients are treated by doctors.

    or d) I made a lamington cake last week.

    Did you get ‘d’ – ‘I made a lamington cake last week.’

    This week’s question is bit difficult because often we like to tell people who did what. So, in the sentence, ‘I baked the cake’. It was me who baked it – no one else – and perhaps I want to let you know I did it all by myself just for you – I didn’t just buy it from a shop!

    But sometimes we don’t have to say who did something because we know – for example – builders build houses, robbers rob banks, and doctors treat patients.

    By the way, a lamington cake is an Australian sponge cake that is made with flour, butter and eggs, and is coated in chocolate and then rolled in coconut.

    Did you notice that I didn’t say who makes lamington cakes – because it’s us, or Australians, or bakers? It’s not important in this sentence, is it?

    Also, did you notice I said, ‘made with’? This is because I was telling you the ingredients of the sponge: that is, flour, butter and eggs.

    If I was talking about something that wasn’t food I’d use ‘made from’ as in, ‘This ring is made from gold.’ And who makes gold rings? Jewellers – but you know this, so I’ve no need to mention it, have I?

    So, when we talk about what makes food (the ingredients) we can use ‘made with’ and everything else is ‘made from’ – and that who makes it is generally not important so we don’t mention it, because we all know who makes or does it.

    OK. Our final quiz.

    Which of these is correct?

    a) Houses are made with bricks.

    b) Cakes are made from butter.

    c) My shirt is made from cotton.

    or d) My shoes are made with leather.

    And again…

    Which of these is correct?

    a) Houses are made with bricks.

    b) Cakes are made from butter.

    c) My shirt is made from cotton.

    or d) My shoes are made with leather.

    Did you get ‘c’ – ‘My shirt is made from cotton.’

    Because houses are made from bricks – not made with, cakes are made with butter – not made from, and shoes are made from leather – not made with.

    If you like English with Kimberley, then tell your friends about it.

    You can also leave feedback about this podcast on Apple Podcasts.

    If you’d like to learn more about this podcast’s grammar – just type ‘passive sentences’ into your search engine and see what comes up.

    You can also find a script of this podcast with a useful link to information about ‘made with and made from’ at www.goaustralia.biz

    I hope you have enjoyed this podcast and you’ll join me again.

    Link: http://bit.ly/2oAGpa9

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